Beer Differences (Part 2)

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Everything you need to know about the different types of beer but were too afraid to ask

Angela Johnson

Ales

Ales typically have a thick layer of foam at the top.Foursquare via njwineandbeer

Ales are brewed with top-fermenting yeast. Fermentation takes place in warm temperatures (between 68 and 72 degrees Fahrenheit), which speeds up the process. For this reason, ales don’t have to be stored for long periods of time.

The yeast rises to the top during fermentation, and as a result, ales generally have a thick layer of foam (also known as the beer head) at the top.

The flavor of an ale tends to be more complex than that of lagers. They also tend to have a fruitier taste. Ales are more comparable to red wines. Ales pair well with burgers, Asian food, and pizza.

IPA

There are three styles of IPAs. quite peculiar/Flickr

They say necessity is the mother of invention, and this is definitely true in the case of the IPA. India pale ale was invented by a London-based brewer for English troops stationed in India.

India’s warm climate was not ideal for making beer, and English brews would not survive the six-month journey journey at sea. So in the late 1700s, George Hodgson exported a strong pale ale to Englishmen in India. He added extra hops and increased the alcohol content, which helped preserve the beer over the long journey. The soldiers even claimed it had a better taste. IPAs gained popularity in the United States in the 1970s.

There are three styles of IPAs – American, English, and Double/Imperial. And while they don’t all taste the same, IPAs are often described as bitter. They pair well with spicy, salty, and grilled foods.

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Appearances

Color based on Standard Reference Method (SRM)
SRM/Lovibond Example Beer color EBC
2 Pale lager,Witbier,Pilsener,Berliner Weisse 4
3 Maibock,Blonde Ale 6
4 Weissbier 8
6 American Pale Ale,India Pale Ale 12
8 Weissbier,Saison 16
10 English Bitter,ESB 20
13 Biere de Garde,Double IPA 26
17 Dark lager,Vienna lager,Marzen,Amber Ale 33
20 Brown Ale,Bock, Dunkel,Dunkelweizen 39
24 Irish Dry Stout,Doppelbock,Porter 47
29 Stout 57
35 Foreign Stout,Baltic Porter 69
40+ Imperial Stout 79

The visual characteristics that may be observed in a beer are colour, clarity, and nature of the head. Colour is usually imparted by the malts used, notably the adjunct malts added to darker beers, though other ingredients may contribute to the colour of some styles such as fruit beers. Colour intensity can be measured by systems such as EBC,SRM or Lovibond, but this information is rarely given to the public.

Many beers are transparent, but some beers, such as hefeweizen, may be cloudy due to the presence of yeast making them translucent. A third variety is the opaque or near-opaque colour that exists with stouts, porters, schwarzbiers(black beer) and other deeply coloured styles. Thickness and retention of the head and the lace it can leave on the glass, are also factors in a beer’s appearance.

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Danish Seaweed Beer

In collaboration with the world-renowned Danish brewery company Herslev Bryghus, we have developed an amazing beer.

It’s a pale ale made with organic barley malt and organic hops – and of course our own wild harvested sugar kelp! The sugar kelp is harvested at the right season for giving the best taste to the beer! Our beer have a alcohol percentage at 5.9 vol and is made in 0.5 bottles!

A sweetness and salt taste from the seaweed combined with the classic english pale ale taste – enjoy!

Right now it’s possibal to drink this wunderfull beer at some of the best michelin restaurants in Denmark, in the future, we hope, that foreign restaurants will be aware of what seaweed can do in beer.

Seaweed beer at the beach

Seaweed beer

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BREWING WITH HERBS

Quick Guide To Brewing Beer With Herbs

by David Ackley

Brewing beer with herbs is not some new fad, a product of the recent craft beer boom. Before hops were popular (we’re talking hundreds of years ago), a wide variety of herbs and spices provided the bittering and flavoring characteristics to balance beer’s malty sweetness. Brewing beer with herbs was the norm. By adding herbs in your own homebrew, you can recreate ancient styles of beer (such as Sahti and Scottish Gruit) and also exercise your creative spirit to develop something entirely new. Below are just a short list of herbs, flowers, and other plants that can be used, alone or in combination, to contribute a unique flavor profile to your homebrew:

Basil
Betony
Birch
Borage
Chamomile
Coriander
Dandelion
Elderflowers

Ginger
Ginseng
Heather
Horehound
Juniper
Lavender
Lemon Balm
Licorice

Mint
Nettles
Oregano
Rhubarb
Rosemary
Sage
Savory
Thyme

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Breweries at Large

Photo: dirigobeer/photo

Looking for local beer from the source?

This is the map for you.

By Tom Minervino and Kate McCarty

Flights of four Allagash beers are available in its tasting room.

Allagash Brewing Company
Brewery tasting rooms have proliferated in Maine in recent years thanks to the craft beer boom and some beneficial changes to state beer laws. From Kittery to Orono to Monhegan Island, breweries are offering up tastes and growler fills of just about any style of beer imaginable. Some of these operations have large spaces and a wide array of tap choices; others are roughly the size of a closet, with only a couple brews to showcase. Read on to find out all the important details. read complete article here

Standard Beer Release and Review

Beer Release: Peak Faze IPA

In honor of the comeback of our favorite free safety, and the near commencing of the Seahawks’ regular season, we give you Peak Faze IPA!

The guy who gave Gronk a gronking to remember is back and faster/tougher than ever. As with ET himself, this beer is small for it’s category (6.3%), but it can drill holes in the chest of beers twice its size. Centennial, Simcoe and Mosaic ride on top of pale, wheat and crystal malts with British yeast for a righteous, hazy juiced IPA that finishes bone dry.

Beer Release: Tropical Static

Sometimes you just gotta go and make a beer that doesn’t fit into any stylistic category.Tropical Static is one of those beers, experimental and hard to describe. A blend of fruits (guava, blackberry and gooseberry) were fermented alongside a fairly simple profile of malts. The ABV got up to 7.2% before it was all said and done, and it felt right to bring in some added hop character. We added copious quantities of cryogenically isolated hop oils from Mosaic and Simcoe to boost the hop-derived fruitiness. The end product is like a hoppy fruit punch. Come and grab a glass and enjoy some patio sunshine this weekend!

Beer Release: MK Delta

It seems like a solar eclipse is as good a day as any to drop another beer named for a shadowy government project. Following the tradition of the MK series, MK Delta is soured in the fermenter before being fed yeast and fruit, in this case tart gooseberries. Grains of pale malt, flaked barley and wheat bring it up to 7.6% abv. It’s loaded with the distinct flavor of gooseberry, which is difficult to describe, but has notes of white grapes, cranberries and wet rose petals. Come and get it!

Double Beer Release: Citra Pale, Flavor Country IPA

Double Beer Release: Citra Pale, Flavor Country IPA

August 11, 2017As if Bob’s Your Uncle wasn’t enough to get you down here this weekend, we are also giving you a new batch of Citra Pale and a new IPA called Flavor Country! On top of all that, did you know that the Seahawks are playing their first preseason game on Sunday night? We’ll have it on the screen, naturally. Game time is at 5pm.Citra Pale –Citra is one of the most beloved hops, and doesn’t need a supporting cast of characters. This makes it a perfect fit for the single hop treatment. We left it alone with a clean yeast, pale malt, and lots of oat for body. Loaded with tropical fruit, lime and grapefruit notes, but refreshing as they come with a bright, clean finish. This is your hoppy session beer of choice this weekend, at 5.3%.Flavor Country IPA –We decided to push the envelope with this little number. We kept the ABV at a reasonable level at 6.6%, but packed in a resinous, fruity hopbill of Simcoe, Cashmere and Calypso. We added a ridiculous amount of dry hop to this one, and the whole mess sits on top of a grain bill that includes pilsner, unmalted wheat, flaked oats and light caramel malts. British yeast leaves this beer hazy and stone fruity, with a round body. Welcome to Flavor Country.original source

Rose Hip Ale

The Pump House Brewery and Restaurant, located in Moncton, NB, opened its doors in September of 1999. This small brewpub has grown to producing many fine ales and lagers and they’ve brought home a fair number of awards over the years including “Brewery of the Year” from the Canadian Brewery Awards. Offering many year-round, local favourites and a quickly growing number of seasonal and one-off brews, this small brewery is sure to have a beer for anyone to enjoy.

IMG_1503The Pump House released their Rose Hip Ale just this summer and already people are talking about this refreshing ale brewed with rose hips.

Appearance: This ale pours with a lively carbonation producing a white head made of tiny, champagne-like bubbles. The colour is a golden, almost burnt orange and is fairly cloudy.

Aroma: Sweet bready aroma upfront with a light fruitiness – almost melon. It’s quite like a saison in aroma with the wheat coming through.

Taste: The flavour of the wheat shines with some spicy notes and fruitiness of under ripe apple and sweet melon. There are some slight floral hints as well.

Mouthfeel: The body is fairly light accented with the slightly elevated carbonation. There is a slight prickliness on the tip of the tongue, otherwise quite enjoyable.

Overall: This is a nice beer. It’s not heavy in any aspect and very easy to drink. Great beer on a hot day. A great lawnmower beer. It changes slightly as it warms, but it probably won’t stay in your glass long enough to notice.

http://www.drinknbrew.com

-Cheers!

BEER DOs and DON’Ts

A Beer Geek’s Guide to Storing & Serving Temperatures

By Jeff Flowers

As you may know, heat is one of beer’s big enemies. It can promote oxidation, which is what happens when natural compounds within the beer react with oxygen leading to off flavors in your beer. Heat can also result in flavor loss altogether, creating a bland product that is in no way reflective of the beer in its original state. It can even age a beer at a more rapid rate and for beer stored at various temperatures with other conditions remaining the same, at 100°F the beer will remain okay for about a week, two months when stored at 70°F and for up to a year at 40°F. Simply put, the lower the temperature the longer the beer is preserved.

Ice Cold Beer

From storage tips to serving temperatures, let’s take a closer look at the many factors that can have an affect on the overall quality of your beer.

Avoid Both Heat & Light

So, how much heat can you expose your beer to? Well, as a general guideline, if you don’t have any more room in the fridge, room temperature storage is acceptable so long as the beer is kept out of the reach of another enemy — light.

Light can have a far more detrimental impact than heat, resulting in off flavors. Though, the thing about heat, as previously mentioned, is that it ages the beer more quickly. So, if you plan on storing the beer for an extended period of time before cracking it open, it’s advisable to keep it at a lower temperature.

Storing Beer: Kegerator vs. Refrigerator

A refrigerator will certainly get the job done, but if you don’t have the space then you’ll need to find a better solution. In this case,a kegerator is the optimal solution as it provides an environment that is always cool and dark but unlike your household refrigerator, the door isn’t opened nearly as often helping to avoid frequent temperature changes.

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